Menu
Menu
MIS100 2012: The new leadership platform

MIS100 2012: The new leadership platform

CIOs of the largest ICT using organistions in New Zealand are taking on added tracks - including revenue generation and managing the impact of disruptive technologies.

Changes in titles and reporting lines This year’s report shows a number of new CIO appointments that indicate some of the changes in the reporting lines and restructuring in both the public and private sectors.

Among the new ICT executives in this year’s report are: Tracy Voice at the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Brian Northern of Fulton Hogan (who rose from the ranks as IT manager), Graeme Osbourne of the Ministry of Health, Don Robertson of Healthcare New Zealand, Ashley Mudford of the Department of Conservation, Roger Rennie of PGG Wrightson, Russell Ambrose at Vector, Elizabeth Coulter at the University of Auckland, John Simpson at Southern District Health Board (who was in acting capacity in 2011), Glen Wilson of Foodstuffs Wellington, David Trappitt at NZ Police, Peter Fletcher of Westpac, Miles Fordyce at New Zealand Post, Alex Hanlon at the University of Canterbury, and Nic Mair at AgResearch.

This year finds heads of ICT having a range of titles. At the Otago Polytechnic, Mike Collins’ title has shifted from CIO to Director Learning Environment. “As an institution, we see the need for strategic investment into technology, systems and learning spaces. The decision was made to extend my portfolio to entail technology, systems, buildings, facilities and services,” he says.

At the ACC, CIO Richard Doig moved into the role of general manager, enterprise planning and information technology, and former Housing NZ CIO Paul Jepson took on the CIO mantle.

This year, there are 37 heads of ICT who report to the CEO or managing director, compared to 42 in 2011 and 43 in 2010. Seventeen of them report to the CFO or head of finance in the enterprise, the same number in 2011, but lower than the 19 in 2010. Nine report to the chief operating officer or their equivalent. The heads of ICT report to a range of other executive roles which include shared services director, general manager customer and technology services, corporate services director and head of business technology applications.

Inside the ICT departments

For the fourth year now, the majority of CIOs in the MIS100 have been reporting static or reduced staff numbers, while project numbers remained the same or increased, and budgets were steady or reduced (see graph on left).

Meanwhile, the average number of screens continues to grow. This year, the total number of screens for all MIS100 organisations is 535,975, compared to 509,516 in 2011 and 455,915 in 2010. For those in the top 25, this means the IT is managing an average number of 11,634 screens, a jump from 11,267 in 2011, 9960 in 2010 and 9201 in 2009 (see graph at bottom left).

Global networks

CIOs of at least 12 organisations in the MIS100 have the added responsibility of leading offshore IT teams.

Two of them — Fletcher Building and Fonterra — are in the top 10 of the list and are both in the manufacturing sector.

“Our decentralised structure, with over 40 independent businesses within a global operation, brings about its own unique challenges,” says Fletcher CIO Paul Knight. “We’re constantly looking to innovate and find new ways to bridge the organisational and geographical divides through streamlining our approach to communications across all our offices.”

This focus is echoed by two other NZ CIOs working with global teams.

Chris Barendregt of Fonterra says the company is building an IS platform for the global business that will remove “technology risks and constraints” while optimising value, and improving and supporting business insights and innovations.

Kevin Drinkwater of Mainfreight says IT in the supply chain and logistics company is used to “support and complement the operations, and bring greater efficiencies”. Mainfreight is increasing its ICT budget, staff and projects as it continues its expansion overseas. Their IT investment, he says, is carefully considered and weighed against business objectives, rather than implementing technology for technology’s sake.

Professional engineering and related consultancy services Beca Group has likewise standardised infrastructure to reduce cost, by employing the same networking technology across its multiple regional offices, thereby keeping skills costs down.Changes in titles and reporting lines This year’s report shows a number of new CIO appointments that indicate some of the changes in the reporting lines and restructuring in both the public and private sectors.

Among the new ICT executives in this year’s report are: Tracy Voice at the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Brian Northern of Fulton Hogan (who rose from the ranks as IT manager), Graeme Osbourne of the Ministry of Health, Don Robertson of Healthcare New Zealand, Ashley Mudford of the Department of Conservation, Roger Rennie of PGG Wrightson, Russell Ambrose at Vector, Elizabeth Coulter at the University of Auckland, John Simpson at Southern District Health Board (who was in acting capacity in 2011), Glen Wilson of Foodstuffs Wellington, David Trappitt at NZ Police, Peter Fletcher of Westpac, Miles Fordyce at New Zealand Post, Alex Hanlon at the University of Canterbury, and Nic Mair at AgResearch.

This year finds heads of ICT having a range of titles. At the Otago Polytechnic, Mike Collins’ title has shifted from CIO to Director Learning Environment. “As an institution, we see the need for strategic investment into technology, systems and learning spaces. The decision was made to extend my portfolio to entail technology, systems, buildings, facilities and services,” he says.

At the ACC, CIO Richard Doig moved into the role of general manager, enterprise planning and information technology, and former Housing NZ CIO Paul Jepson took on the CIO mantle.

This year, there are 37 heads of ICT who report to the CEO or managing director, compared to 42 in 2011 and 43 in 2010. Seventeen of them report to the CFO or head of finance in the enterprise, the same number in 2011, but lower than the 19 in 2010. Nine report to the chief operating officer or their equivalent. The heads of ICT report to a range of other executive roles which include shared services director, general manager customer and technology services, corporate services director and head of business technology applications.

Inside the ICT departments

For the fourth year now, the majority of CIOs in the MIS100 have been reporting static or reduced staff numbers, while project numbers remained the same or increased, and budgets were steady or reduced (see graph on left).

Meanwhile, the average number of screens continues to grow. This year, the total number of screens for all MIS100 organisations is 535,975, compared to 509,516 in 2011 and 455,915 in 2010. For those in the top 25, this means the IT is managing an average number of 11,634 screens, a jump from 11,267 in 2011, 9960 in 2010 and 9201 in 2009 (see graph at bottom left).

Global networks

CIOs of at least 12 organisations in the MIS100 have the added responsibility of leading offshore IT teams.

Two of them — Fletcher Building and Fonterra — are in the top 10 of the list and are both in the manufacturing sector.

“Our decentralised structure, with over 40 independent businesses within a global operation, brings about its own unique challenges,” says Fletcher CIO Paul Knight. “We’re constantly looking to innovate and find new ways to bridge the organisational and geographical divides through streamlining our approach to communications across all our offices.”

This focus is echoed by two other NZ CIOs working with global teams.

Chris Barendregt of Fonterra says the company is building an IS platform for the global business that will remove “technology risks and constraints” while optimising value, and improving and supporting business insights and innovations.

Kevin Drinkwater of Mainfreight says IT in the supply chain and logistics company is used to “support and complement the operations, and bring greater efficiencies”. Mainfreight is increasing its ICT budget, staff and projects as it continues its expansion overseas. Their IT investment, he says, is carefully considered and weighed against business objectives, rather than implementing technology for technology’s sake.

Professional engineering and related consultancy services Beca Group has likewise standardised infrastructure to reduce cost, by employing the same networking technology across its multiple regional offices, thereby keeping skills costs down.

Open for business

CIOs in this year’s report say they will embark on a range of ICT projects, with mobility getting the greatest uptake from 68 percent of the respondents. Business continuity and disaster recovery is second, and virtualisation, which was the number one project last year, is now number three. The Christchurch earthquake has prompted

reviews and revision of the DR programmes across sectors. Interestingly, nearly half of the respondents, at 42 percent, are embarking on social media projects, compared to just under a third (32 percent) the previous year (see above graph).

This year, a number of CIOs report a greater involvement in projects that directly involve revenue. These could be from support for social media programmes around marketing, to enhancing business intelligence systems for operations and new services. This is exemplified by Fulton Hogan’s new Group CIO Brian Northern, who says, “There is a real benefit in capturing information digitally from the field, which improves data accuracy and enables more timely reporting.”

“ICT helps us to achieve business objectives for Vero NZ by making it easier for intermediaries, partners and customers to do business with us, while reducing the cost of doing business and by assisting decision-making by providing timely access to relevant data,” explains Andrew Diver, Vero CIO. The continued requests by employees to use their own devices, such as smartphones and tablets, within the work environment has required IT to develop a BYOD response that enables greater freedom for employees to use these devices, while still maintaining security of infrastructure and information. While the CIOs see BYOD as a key challenge, they also acknowledge the gains for the organisation that manages it well. “By giving our people the right tools to do the job, and the freedom to use them as often as they like, we create efficiencies, lower costs and ultimately add real value to our business,” says Fletcher’s Paul Knight.

Sidebar: Calculating the top 100

The MIS100 is a study of New Zealand’s biggest ICT-using organisations based on screen count, turnover and staff numbers. The screen number is given 50 percent of the final weighting, and turnover and employees get 25 percent each. The screen numbers include PCs, servers, laptops and hand-held devices like iPads, Blackberrys and other web-enabled PDAs.

Sheila O’Brien (sobrien@fairfaxbm.co.nz), manager of Fairfax Business Research in New Zealand, provided the analysis of the MIS100 data and graphs.

Follow CIO on

Twitter @cio_nz

Facebook

LinkedIn

Download CIO for your tablet here.

Click here to subscribe to CIO.

Sign up to receive free CIO newsletters.

Send news tips to divina@cio.co.nz

Join the CIO New Zealand group on LinkedIn. The group is open to CIOs, IT Directors, COOs, CTOs and senior IT managers.

Join the CIO New Zealand newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags MIS100

Show Comments