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NZ and NY Police target technologies of interest

NZ and NY Police target technologies of interest

“From Agile development to strategic partnering, there are a number of ways we can be smarter and quicker,” says NZ Police Commissioner Mike Bush.

Senior members of the New York Police Department (NYPD) met this week with their counterparts in New Zealand and discussed their work across key technologies for modern policing.

“We know that policing is done on the street,” says New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush, who welcomed the NYPD group led by Chief of Intelligence Thomas Galati.

“Freeing officers to get out from behind their desks is vital,” says Bush. “From New York to New Plymouth, there are situations and experiences that are universal to all police officers. That’s why we are not just investing in technology, we are investing in ideas. Sharing these is the best way of staying ahead of the curve.”

The US delegation visited the Police Mobile Innovation Lab and Experience Centre which was opened late last year in Wellington.

At the Mobility Innovation Lab and Experience Centre: Chief of Intelligence Thomas P. Galati, Superintendent Jevon McSkimming, Commanding Officer John P. Miedreich, Mobile Innovation Lab and Experience Centre Director Angela Clothier
At the Mobility Innovation Lab and Experience Centre: Chief of Intelligence Thomas P. Galati, Superintendent Jevon McSkimming, Commanding Officer John P. Miedreich, Mobile Innovation Lab and Experience Centre Director Angela Clothier

Read more: When the IoT meets your IT department…

We need to be able to keep on top of the latest developments to ensure we continue to meet global security challenges

Mike Bush, NZ Police

Galati says the innovation centre, which was developed by Vodafone with the NZ Police, shows how public and private organisation work in creating “a smarter way to police”.

Galati says one of their major programs that made a difference in operations was the Domain Awareness System (DAS) which it developed with Microsoft.

“The system connects to more than 3000 video cameras around New York City and allows us access to multiple data sources in a matter of moments,” he states. “We can see video, grab audio when shots are fired, and monitor for biological and radioactive hazards. It has really helped us get on top of incidents immediately.”

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Thomas P. Galati of NYPD; Anne Speden of NZ Police and John P. Miedreich of NYPD
Thomas P. Galati of NYPD; Anne Speden of NZ Police and John P. Miedreich of NYPD

We can see video, grab audio when shots are fired, and monitor for biological and radioactive hazards. It has really helped us get on top of incidents immediately.

Thomas Galati, NYPD

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Common concerns

A common interest in both departments is the use of mobile devices for frontline staff.

NYPD has recently embarked an ambitious mobility program, which will see 30,000 smartphones and 6000 tablets issued to frontline staff. New Zealand Police has also rolled out more than 15,000 smartphones and tablets to police officers.

“It was clear that we are both investing heavily in mobile initiatives to support our frontline police,” says Anne Speden, (acting) director, Information, Technology and Systems, NZ Police/

NYPD Chief of Intelligence Thomas P. Galati with Anne Speden, Executive Director: Information, Technology & Systems (Acting), NZ Police
NYPD Chief of Intelligence Thomas P. Galati with Anne Speden, Executive Director: Information, Technology & Systems (Acting), NZ Police

When it comes to mobility, the right approach is vital. It’s got to be people, process and then technology.

Anne Speden, NZ Police

Speden says mobility is the key enabler for law enforcement across the globe.

“When I talk to other agencies internationally it’s top of the list,” says Speden, who visited NYPD in April.

“They were interested in how we worked with our strategic partners at the Innovation Lab and Experience Centre, and so we extended an invitation for them to visit. They agreed that this public/private engagement approach is helping deliver a smarter way to police.”

“When it comes to mobility, the right approach is vital. It’s got to be people, process and then technology; we start by asking questions and listening to our stakeholders have to say.”

’Moving in the same direction’

NZ Police Commissioner Bush sums up the importance of the meeting:

“We’re all moving in the same direction. This means pooling our resources. The rate of change is huge, and the best way to keep up with it is to collaborate."

Read more: ‘As customers transition to smartphones, so should you’

“We live in a fast changing interconnected world, where access to information is vital. We need to be able to keep on top of the latest developments to ensure we continue to meet global security challenges.”

“There is a growing need to share more than just general information. We need to communicate fresh ideas and new ways of working, particularly in the technology space. From Agile development to strategic partnering, there are a number of ways we can be smarter and quicker.”

Send news tips and comments to divina_paredes@idg.co.nz

Follow Divina Paredes on Twitter: @divinap

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