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Kiwis accept fingerprint and eye-scan security to protect personal data

Kiwis accept fingerprint and eye-scan security to protect personal data

Survey shows support for greater IT security amidst rising concerns over identity theft and financial fraud

Five out of 10 New Zealanders are extremely or very concerned about the security of their financial transactions, which is a sharp rise, according to the latest Unisys Security Index. The research also reveals New Zealanders support the utilisation of biometric technologies, such as fingerprint and eye scans to protect their personal and financial information.

“The level of concern about identity theft and financial fraud continues to rise in New Zealand,” says Mike Webber, manager, enterprise security, Unisys, which conducted the survey in September. The survey covered a representative sample of 504 respondents aged 18 and above.

“More than half of those surveyed say their level of worry was either ‘very’ or ‘extreme’ when it came to the protection of their personal information, or the protection of credit and debit card details,” he says.

Over half (51 per cent) of respondents say they were extremely or very concerned about other people obtaining and using their credit and debit card details, up 8 per cent since the last survey.

Forty-nine per cent of New Zealanders say they are extremely or very concerned about unauthorised access to and misuse of their personal information, which is 2 per cent higher than the previous survey.

Interestingly, women were more concerned about computer security than men. Forty-five per cent of the female respondents say they are extremely or very concerned about computer security in relation to viruses and unsolicited email, compared to 29 per cent of the men surveyed.

The search shows 97 per cent of New Zealanders are willing to use one or more secure identity verifiers, including biometrics such as fingerprint and iris scans, to protect themselves and their information and finances.

The highest level of support for identification verification is the use of photographs, with an estimated 73 percent of respondents saying they would be willing to use this method to identify themselves to the government, banks and other organisations.

Low-tech identifiers such as pins and passwords remain popular with 64 per cent and 63 per cent support respectively.

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Tags new technologiesbiometrics

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