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FaceTime

FaceTime has nearly 1000 customers, including nine of the top 10 US banks, to monitor instant messaging and other real-time communications. Its strategic partners include AOL, Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, Skype, IBM, Reuters and Jabber.

Global HQ: Belmont, California, US Website: www.facetime.com

Global leader: Kailash Ambwani, president and CEO

Local leader: Deric Moilliet, managing director, Australia and New Zealand

Core Activity: Security software for messaging systems

Revenue: Not disclosed

Key customers: Reserve Bank of New Zealand, UUNZ Institute of Business, Barclays, Citigroup, General Electric, HSBC, Ingram Micro, McDonalds, NEC, Turner Broadcasting

Employees: 185

After carving out a role to improve the security of Instant Messaging, FaceTime Communications is riding a second technology tsunami — providing security for users of Facebook and similar social networking sites.

FaceTime Communications, founded in 1998, offers enterprise gateway software and hardened appliance products that secure, control and manage instant messaging, web conferencing and P2P file sharing. It also claims to be the first company to provide security for unified communications solutions like Microsoft’s Office Communication Server and IBM’s Lotus Sametime.

Such devices allow an electronic paper trail to monitor IM conversations that might otherwise be difficult to recover. The rise of Sarbannes-Oxley led finance houses to install FaceTime as a compliance measure. Now, such businesses are using FaceTime to monitor the various UC systems analysts say organisations will increasingly rely on.

FaceTime has nearly 1000 customers, including nine of the top 10 US banks, to monitor instant messaging and other real-time communications. Its strategic partners include AOL, Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, Skype, IBM, Reuters and Jabber.

FaceTime CEO Kailas Ambwani recently told the Milwaukee Business-Journal that the growth of social networking sites such as Facebook presented new security risks for businesses, especially as employees would expect to be able to use such sites at work.

However, the FaceTime strategy is rather simple, Ambwani said in the newspaper interview: Stand back and let market giants like Cisco, IBM and Microsoft evangelise and educate customers about unified communications. Then, FaceTime can step in and show customers how to close the weak security links in those systems. Darren Greenwood

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