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First ISV ready to deliver application on Sun Grid

First ISV ready to deliver application on Sun Grid

An independent software vendor (ISV) in the U.K. will be the first Sun Microsystems Inc. partner to deliver a commercial application using the pay-per-use Sun Grid Compute Utility.

An independent software vendor (ISV) in the U.K. will be the first Sun Microsystems Inc. partner to deliver a commercial application using the pay-per-use Sun Grid Compute Utility. CDO2 Ltd., a London-based financial services application provider, has finished a trial deployment of its application on Sun Grid and is ready to go to market with a hosted application, said Gary Kendall, director and founder of CDO2.

CDO2 ran a trial of its CDOSheet application running on the Solaris 10 operating system on a 128-node (256-processor) Sun grid. The system took one week to install and was run remotely at a data center in Scotland, controlled from London, Kendall said.

Sun launched its Sun Grid initiative in February, offering computing cycles and storage capacity on a pay-per-use basis. Sun charges US$1 per CPU per hour for server power and $1 per gigabyte per month for storage capacity.

CDO2, launched 18 months ago, has been selling its CDOSheet product to a handful of financial services customers, including Commerce Bancorp Inc., which are running it on their own networks, Kendall said. But because the application needs a large amount of computing power, it is difficult for organizations smaller than the largest investment banks and insurance brokerages to use the application, he said.

By selling it on a pay-per-use basis and hosting on Sun Grid, CDO2 can reach a broader customer base with its product, Kendall said.

"Some of the financial services users are the largest users of computer resources, and they run grids in-house," he said. "What’s unusual about what we’re doing is we can bring the grid to a larger group of customers who aren’t used to using such computing power."

The pay-per-use model also is attractive to smaller customers that can't afford the financial investment of building out network infrastructure but can budget to pay for the capacity they use, Kendall said. "It enables smaller customers to get involved with a much smaller commitment," he said.

Kendall said CDO2 will charge a premium on top of the Sun Grid pricing to derive revenue from selling a hosted version of its application.

Sun and CDO2 also are working together to develop a demonstration center that will let potential customers do a trial run of CDOSheet on Sun Grid using their own data, according to the vendors.

Additionally, extended trials of the application can be booked at the Scotland data center. However, that center is for trial runs only, Kendall said. The Sun Grid-hosted application that customers buy from CDO2 will run on grids in one of three official Sun Grid data centers, which are in London, New Jersey and Virginia. -- IDG News Service

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