CIO

VMware

Virtualisation is no longer an easy win for VMware. US and global revenues, particularly in new licences, have slowed and Microsoft and others are eagerly vying for the same space.

Global HQ: Palo Alto, California, US Website: www.vmware.com

Global leader: Paul Maritz, president and CEO

Local leader: Paul Harapin, VP Australia and New Zealand

Core activity: Virtualisation from desktop to the cloud

Revenue: US$1.9 billion (FY07-08 ended December 31)

Key customers: Kordia, Ports of Auckland, Inland Revenue, Bank of NZ, Fonterra, NZ Defence Force, Tegel Foods, Manukau Institute of Technology, University of Auckland, Dunedin Casino, Ravensdown, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australia Post, Suncorp Metway

Employees: 7000

Virtualisation is no longer an easy win for VMware. US and global revenues, particularly in new licences, have slowed and Microsoft and others are eagerly vying for the same space.

When storage giant EMC Corporation acquired the company six years ago it found a goldmine - VMware’s virtual desktop, server, datacentre and cloud computing innovations meant it became one of the world’s fastest growing software companies.

The VMware suite of tools delivers a secure, personalised view of data regardless of physical device or location, while making the IT department’s role simpler and less costly. Now vSphere 4 and vCentre, plus complementary management and desktop products, further automate key IT processes, streamlining performance and supercharging storage access.

While the virtual computing challenge is still hugely attractive to those eager to free themselves from traditional systems, innovation through acquisitions and partnerships will be essential for VMware to keep its edge. Keith Newman