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Stories by Steve Hodgkinson

Unite and conquer

The Australia 2020 Summit focuses everyone on big-picture issues. What would you have said if you were asked to represent the interests of the IT sector at the event? What one thing can government do to strengthen the contribution of IT to Australia's competitiveness?
Tyranny of distance

Written by Steve Hodgkinson02 May 08 22:00

Whither the public sector knowledge worker?

The next few years are shaping up to be something of a crossroads for public sector knowledge workers. A growing crisis is emerging driven by an ageing workforce, widening remuneration gap between public and private sector, changing expectations of younger workers and the growing complexity of public policy issues. These things have been sneaking up on us, but we may look back on this as the year government woke up to the need to invest in its own organisational fabric.
One of the symptoms is the progressive down-wasting of document and records management capabilities — like a glacier slowly retreating up a valley, a barely noticeable consequence of diminished snowfall years ago in unseen mountain snowfields.

Written by Steve Hodgkinson10 April 08 22:00

Interfacing with ‘wild west’ IT

Frontiers are interesting places. Historically, they were the buffer zone between civilisation and wilderness, between the law and lawlessness. Frightening for many, though exciting and liberating for those with an adventurous spirit.
Many of us now find ourselves pondering a knowledge frontier. At our backs is the order and structure of our organisation, be it a business or a public-sector agency, with its formal processes and information systems. Ahead of us lies the wilderness of ‘the internet’, with its overabundance of information opportunities and threats.

Written by Steve Hodgkinson09 March 08 22:00

Riding the wave

Much was made in 2007 of the rise of social networking driven by web 2.0 and its office-worker cousin enterprise 2.0. This theme trickled from Silicon Valley into the local conference circuit with increasing force during the year. It looks set to grow further in 2008, kicking off with an Enterprise 2.0 Executive Forum being held in Sydney on 19 February by Ross Dawson's Future Exploration Network. It should reveal some tangible examples of enterprise 2.0 in action, which will be welcomed by all with an interest in this topic.
Cochlear was last year's star example, with its use of wikis for collaboration in product development and marketing activities worldwide. A leading public sector example is GovDex, the collaborative portal operated by the Australian Government Information Management Office to encourage sharing between government agencies. Telstra has made extensive use of wikis and blogs to engage in dialogues with its customers and its staff during the year.

Written by Steve Hodgkinson11 Feb. 08 22:00

Drown out the enemy

It was interesting to observe the adventures in the blogosphere in September involving Queensland-based software company 2Clix. The company took exception to comments about its products that were made by contributors to a popular telecommunications industry networking site. 2Clix raised a court action against the site's owner - not against the person who made the comments - alleging that the statements were false and damaging, and seeking financial compensation.
This sparked a storm of blog entries and media commentary, drawing even more attention to the alleged problems in the company's products. Within days, the court action was withdrawn, and 2Clix retired to lick its wounds out of the media spotlight.

Written by Steve Hodgkinson04 Nov. 07 22:00

Who needs Web 2.0?

Web 2.0 platforms are changing the way we think about information, collaboration and intellectual property. We marvel at the net-generation’s use of MySpace, Facebook, YouTube and Wikipedia, but how relevant really are these platforms for the ‘serious’ business of work?
It is fun observing the different personalities creeping out of the organisational farmyard when the conversation turns to ‘enterprise 2.0’, or the use of Web 2.0 platforms in a private or public sector organisation.

Written by Steve Hodgkinson14 Oct. 07 21:00