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In Pictures: Death of India's telegram system

The 160 year-old institution hit hard by Internet, mobile phones

  • As of July 15 Indian authorities will close the country’s 160 year-old telegram service, once a fundamental part of the country’s communication system, used for everything from taking care of official business to reporting deaths and marriages. The government operates the system and says the Internet and mobile phones have rendered the system obsolete. Here we take a quick look at one of the last of its kind.

  • Files are seen stacked up in the record section of the Central Telegraph Office in Mumbai July 10, 2013.

  • An employee sleeps in the record section room of the Central Telegraph Office in Mumbai.

  • The delivery section room of the Central Telegraph Office.

  • An employee stamps a telegram inside the delivery section room of the Central Telegraph Office.

  • Messenger Om Dutt, 56, leaves the Central Telegraph Office.

  • Delivering some of the final telegrams in New Delhi.

  • Ranjit Singh, 83 served as an employee in the Telegraph Office for 33 years.

  • Surjeet Kaur, 77, displays a telegram which was sent to her son by her daughter-in-law in 1978, inside her house in New Delhi.

  • Surjeet Kaur, 77, displays a telegram which was sent by her husband on her birthday in 1955.

  • An employee sends a telegram appealing to Kapil Sibal, India's Minister of Communication and Information Technology, to reverse the decision to close the telegram services.

  • A computer screen shows a telegram message inside the central Telegraph office.

  • A Morse code telegraph machine at the Central Telegraph Office.

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