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Features

  • Why Brexit could cause data privacy headaches for US companies

    The impact of the United Kingdom voting to withdraw from the European Union could have far-reaching implications for international companies who experts say may need to rethink their data management policies as the move could create a network of disparate data sovereignty laws across Europe.

    Written by Brandon Butler29 June 16 04:03
  • How Apple's privacy stance could give Google an AI edge

    "We at Apple reject the idea that our customers should have to make tradeoffs between privacy and security," said Apple CEO Tim Cook earlier this month during an Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) event where he was honored for corporate leadership. "We can and we must provide both in equal measure."

    Written by Matt Kapko24 June 15 00:42
  • How to remain (mostly) invisible online

    With such a heavy reliance on the Internet for all sorts of interactions and transactions and the many ways people are connected via their mobile or desktop devices, is it possible to remain invisible online?

    Written by Bob Violino21 Jan. 15 03:41
  • The future of security: 11 predictions for 2015

    As natural philosopher and onetime baseball catcher Yogi Berra reportedly said: "It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future."

    Written by Taylor Armerding16 Dec. 14 03:30
  • Privacy is the new killer app

    A funny thing is happening in the wake of the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2490179/security0/security0-the-snowden-leaks-a-timeline.html">Edward Snowden NSA revelations</a>, the infamous <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2601905/apple-icloud-take-reputation-hits-after-photo-scandal.html">iCloud hack of celebrity nude photos</a>, and the hit parade of customer data breaches at <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2490637/security0/target-finally-gets-its-first-ciso.html">Target</a>, <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2844491/home-depot-attackers-broke-in-using-a-vendors-stolen-credentials.html">Home Depot</a> and the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2845621/government/us-postal-service-suffers-breach-of-employee-customer-data.html">U.S. Postal Service</a>. If it's not the government looking at your data, it's bored, lonely teenagers from the Internet or credit card fraudsters.

    Written by Matt Weinberger15 Nov. 14 02:37
  • Is the open floor plan trend a data security headache?

    Today, more and more businesses are foregoing the traditional design setup of cubicles and closed-off offices for an open floor plan. Companies like Facebook and Google market their open-office floor plans to potential employees, touting that the design allows workers to work closely together and fosters a culture of collaboration.

    Written by Larry Ponemon26 Aug. 14 03:30
  • Why your online identity can never really be erased

    One seemingly unshakeable truth about the online world since it began is this: The Internet never forgets. Once you post anything online, it is recoverable forever -- the claims of former IRS official Lois Lerner about "lost" emails notwithstanding. Even promises of photos disappearing after a few seconds have been shown to be bogus.

    Written by Taylor Armerding05 Aug. 14 05:37
  • Cloud Computing Poses Control Issues for IT

    Though most U.S. companies still list customer and other corporate information as their most valuable assets, many keep pushing this data farther from safe lockdown in the data center--and are about to give it another strong shove in that direction.

    Written by Kevin Fogarty18 May 10 04:42